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It’s been a long time since I did an update on our food adventure! Got caught up with researching new recipes and well, eating!

Then June holidays happened.

And then Harry Potter happened (a story for another time).

And now it’s back to regular programming :)

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So, moving on with our foodie journey. Just to recap, we were exploring Australian food. Having gone through a barbie and eating a traditional damper, I thought I’d have some fun and freak out the kids by suggesting we eat… Witchetty grubs! You can’t get more Australian than that!

It kind of happened by accident. I was searching around for Australian food, saw a picture of the grubs and was quite repulsed by it. But later on when I was getting something from BreadTalk, I saw some bread that really reminded me of grubs.

Does this…

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…not look vaguely like this?

witchetty grub

Picture credit: CNN Travel

Or ok, maybe there’s a greater resemblance when there are more of them.

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Picture credit: news.com.au

It does right? Right?

Anyway, I was so tickled by the resemblance, and more so by the thought of the kids being completely grossed out, that I had to buy some home to prank them.

I announced to them when they came back home that we were having witchetty grubs for dinner.

“What’s a grub?”

“It’s like a big fat worm or juicy caterpillar. And you eat it live.”

“WHAT? EEEWWWWW!! No I’m not eating it!!”

“But remember? We said the rule was at least two bites of everything!”

And I see the look of regret on Asher’s face. Priceless!

HAHAHAHA

I showed them pictures of grubs, which elicited a whole range of sound effects from the boys. Then I uncovered the plate from afar, held it quite high so that they couldn’t quite get a good look of it, and as they leaned away in disgust, I put it on the table. There was a pause. And then, finally, they laugh with nervous relief and exclaim, “That’s just bread!”

Oh man. Moments like these remind you of how entertaining it can be to be a mummy.

The kids happily tucked into the “grubs” and joyfully declared how wonderful they were. To BreadTalk’s credit, the bread was really delicious! Even the youngest went, “Want more grubs!” It was hilarious to hear.

Apparently, the real deal is nutty-flavoured and is full of nutrients. But I’m pretty sure I’ll never quite pluck up the courage to try it for real.

Then again, never say never huh?

Loving 'grubs'!

Loving ‘grubs’!

Follow us as the adventure continues!

Nair Food Adventure

  1. The Beginning of Our Food Adventure
  2. Week 1 – Down Under: Barbie
  3. Week 1 Down Under: Damper

Read Full Post »

That wasn’t the end of the barbie.

After the kids went to bed, I randomly googled a bit more about Australian food and read about damper. It’s a traditional Australian bread prepared by travellers as they went through the bush. The traditional recipe requires very few ingredients because the travellers would only have had basic rations with them on their long journeys. The basic ingredients are flour, water, and salt. As the camp fire died down, the damper was buried in the ashes of the fire and left there to cook.

I ran to check if the ashes from the barbie were still hot. They were!

Hurried to the kitchen. There was just enough flour.

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My unbaked damper

Quickly mixed the ingredients together, kneaded the dough, flattened it, and with tongs in hand went back to the mini-pit. I made a small depression in the ashes and put the dough straight onto the bed of ashes in the traditional way, then covered it with more ashes and the remaining hot coals. Actually you can also use a dutch oven to cook the bread in the fire, but I thought why not do it as traditionally as we can since we’re at it.

Buried under the ashes

Buried under the ashes

It did cross my mind whether it was healthy to have ashes sticking to the dough, but I figured that this was a traditional method that has stood the test of time, plus many cultures cook food in the ground. So I crossed that thought out.

I went to shower and do other things. In fact, I almost fell asleep!

As I was nodding off I suddenly remembered my damper and ran to retrieve it from the ashes. It was cooked through, and had a hollow sound when tapped. That’s the test to know if your damper is cooked. The centre bit was burned from being cooked too long though.

Burnt in the middle!

Burnt in the middle!

I left it to cool on a rack and headed to bed, eager to tell the boys about it the next day.

The boys were so surprised to learn that you could cook bread from the hot ashes of a barbie. They gamely tried the bread and loved it! We had it with honey, jam, and butter. I loved the smokey flavour of the bread. Pity that I had left it too long and the middle part was inedible.

We agreed that this was definitely something we want to make again, and that we should try it at the next barbeque. Apparently you can even cook it on a stick like how you cook marshmallows. Some travellers got tired of waiting for the bread to cook in the ashes, so they wrapped a bit of dough around a stick and cooked it over the fire. They’d then fill the hole that was left in the bread with jam or honey and pop the whole thing into their mouths. Sounds delicious!

Ellery came home telling me how he told everybody in school about damper, how he had promised to bring some for them, and how I had to make it again. So he woke me up at 645am in the morning to make damper for his friends.

There are many modern versions of damper that use more ingredients and bake the bread in the oven. We made a damper using milk, but deliberately decided to keep it as simple as possible because we wanted it to be authentic, so left out the butter and cheese, etc. Ellery was even skeptical about using milk because he really liked the plain, traditional version.

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Shaping the dough into a ball

Pressing down the dough in the pan.

Pressing down the dough in the pan.

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Oven-baked damper

This modern damper was still good, and went well with butter and jam. Like a bushman’s scone I suppose! But the ash damper has an extra oomph that we all prefer.

I cut a hunk of bread for him to bring to school to share with his friends. You could see the look of satisfaction on his face at being able to share something he had baked himself :)

 

Recipes

Traditional Damper

2 cups self-raising flour
1/2 tsp of salt
2 cups of water

Mix everything together. It will be a bit runny at first. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead for a bit. Not necessary to knead for a long time (I saw one video where the lady didn’t even knead it). Shape the dough into a ball then flatten it. Make imprints all over it with your fingers. Make a clearing in the ashes, put the flattened dough straight onto it, then cover it with more hot ashes. Cook for about 40 minutes.

*The updated version we did was to substitute milk for water. There are many other versions you can find online, including adding herbs. I thought rubbing in butter would make it too much like scones though, rather than bread.

This video shows how to put the dough into the ashes.

 

Nair Food Adventure

  1. The Beginning of Our Food Adventure
  2. Week 1 – Down Under: Barbie

Read Full Post »