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Back during the September holidays, Asher had the privilege of attending a 3-day Astronaut Training Camp conducted by The Little Executive. I had let him decide if he wanted to attend the course, and upon hearing the words “astronaunt”, “space”, and “mission”, he was sold.

It was four days of space adventure and exploration for the kids. There were several missions to complete each day. Among the many missions, they had to identify and communicate with aliens, help lost aliens find each other, make astronaut food, make slime, and for the grand finale, plan, create and unveil their spaceship!

The learning goals for this camp were for the kids learn and practice communication skills, teamwork, problem solving, sharpen their sensory systems, and delve into their imagination, all while having fun!

Asher is generally the one-word-response kind of boy.

“How was your day?”

“Good.”

And even if I posed a more open ended questions on how his day went, his responses are usually quite brief. But at the end of each day at this camp, he would go on and on about what he did, what they were planning for the spaceship, how much fun he had, and that he couldn’t wait to come back again the next day. Definitely a score!

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Each child had a Space Traveller Passport, and I liked how The Little Executive linked each day’s goals back to the theme. It made what they were doing relevant to their astronaut personas. So if one of the aims was to work on hand-eye coordination, the application was that astronauts depended heavily on such skills for repairing sensitive equipment, landing spacecraft and even seemingly simple tasks like treating wounds in a zero gravity environment. If there was an activity that worked on precision and accuracy, they linked it back to how astronauts needed to be extremely observant and make detailed, accurate reports about their missions because others depended on their reports to learn about the universe.

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Asher’s Space Traveller Passport

Every passport needs a passport photo!

Every passport needs a passport photo!

One of the activities was a constellation track, which Asher really enjoyed. He had to guide his friends through a constellation of stars (the kids walked among silver cups) according to a pre-determined path, much like how mission control guides a team remotely. It’s fun for the kids, but really tests their ability to observe, translate from 2D to 3D space, and communicate their instructions clearly to others. Slime-making was a big hit too as you can imagine.

The constellation walk

The constellation walk

Slimmmyyy

Slimmmyyy. Look at the expressions on the boys faces! Disgust of delight? :) (Photo credit: The Little Executive

Making astronaut food - freeze dried bananas

Making astronaut food (Photo credit: The Little Executive)

There was a special machine for freeze drying the bananas

There was a special machine for dehydrating the bananas! (Photo credit: The Little Executive)  

Exploring sensory bins with and without gloves to discover the differences in the experience (Photo credit: The Little Executive)

Exploring sensory bins with and without gloves to discover the differences 

 

However, the activity he talked about the most was the building of the spaceship. Asher has built things from cardboard and scrap materials at home before, but it’s usually individual work, and anything he wants, goes. For the camp spaceship building activity, I really liked hearing him say things like, “we discussed…”, “we agreed…”, “we voted…”, “we compromised…” And also, “so-and-so came up with this cool idea!”

I liked that building the spacecraft was a team activity. Every kid had his or her own ideas on what could be done, but it was clear from what Asher told me that the kids shared their ideas, and the rest of the crew (the kids) had a chance to chime in whether they thought it was good or not, and together they decided whether to adopt the idea in the end. He even told me what they would do if the decision wasn’t unanimous (which happens of course!) They also devised a way to divide the work, with each kid responsible for building a different part of the spacecraft, but with a common end-goal in mind. Kids sorting things out on their own, even if they only just met. I think that’s a great life skill to learn.

Working together

Working together to implement their ideas (Photo credit: The Little Executive)

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It’s hard work building a spaceship (Photo credit: The Little Executive)

So at the unveiling of the spaceship, even though it was not a professional looking, slick kind of spacecraft, there was a lot of effort and teamwork put into it. And most importantly, if you asked the kids to tell you more, they could supply you with so many details about what each part was, what it was really made of (that’s not really cardboard, I mean, c’mon!), what it does, why they added it to the spaceship, etc. They definitely knew what they were doing when they added each and every part of the spaceship. I especially loved how they even made things that were on the inside of the spacecraft that couldn’t be seen from the outside. They did it not for show, but because it needed to be there. There was a purpose. You could also feel the kids’ sense of collective ownership. They knew who contributed ideas for which part, but it was their spaceship, because they decided on what went into it together, and worked together to build it.

Adding fuel to the engines

Adding fuel to the engines – one of the unseen details the kids included

 

The spaceship

To infinity and beyond! Part the of the spaceship the kids crafted.

From the activity sheets that Asher brought home at the end of the camp, I thought the activities were very novel and fun for the kids. The kids probably didn’t realise how much they were learning. It’s a case of more-than-meets-the-eye. For some of the activities, I can’t put my finger on it, on how it works, but it’s almost like it’s a process the kids have to go through in order to unlock something inside. Then something clicks, and they have it. I don’t know how. You gotta ask Michelle about it.

Doing some mission activities (Photo credit: The Little Executive)

Doing some mission activities (Photo credit: The Little Executive)

Actually, there are two Michelles at The Little Executive. Michelle Choy and Michelle Tham are co-founders of The Little Executive. Not only do they share the same first name, they share the same vision to better prepare children for life, not just school, in an arguably more uncertain future. They believe that children need three key things:

  1. Essential skills, in particular executive functioning skills which are like the “command and control” of the brain;
  2. Healthy learning habits that enable kids to think before they act
  3. A growth mindset that allows insight to emerge from failure, and resilience to be built from mistakes

These were really the reasons why I was interested to find out more about the holidays camps and courses at The Little Executive. I think it’s good for the kids to develop the three aspects of essential skills, healthy learning habits, and a growth mindset, from as early as possible. Not for any other reason than it’s just good for them. For living. For life.

In my own kids, I’ve seen how challenging things can be when there are gaps in these areas. I like how The Little Executives focuses not on imparting content knowledge, but really nurturing the process part of things. And it is a partnership with the parents, of course, as these things cannot be left to a class to solve alone.

So if you like the notion of your kids developing their essential skills and executive functioning, learning habits, and building a growth mindset, you will probably find the holiday camps at The Little Executive right up your alley. Not only is it a fun camp for the kids with many interesting activities, the camp equips them with skills that are transferable to other areas of their lives.

The Little Executives will be holding three holiday camps during the year-end holidays. One of them is an expanded version of the Astronaut Camp that Asher went for. It’s is now a 4-day camp, instead of just 3 days. Details of the three camps are listed below.

Slots are filling up fast, so if you are keen, you should sign up soon!

The Little Executives have generously offered readers of this blog a 15% discount on camp fees. Just quote “leisure15” when you sign up.

dec-holiday-astro-camp

Calling all little astronauts! This December holidays, let us take your child on a mission to Outer Space. Through this unique 4-day camp, aspiring astronauts will hone their problem solving skills to complete Space Missions, enhance their teamwork and communication skills as they work together as a crew, and sharpen their sensory systems while exploring new territories.

dec-camp_dino-camp

Your mini paleontologist will embark on a dino-dig, unearthing ancient dinosaur fossils and working together as a team to reconstruct a dinosaur skeleton! They will trace how dinosaurs lived through the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods, while learning about evolution. The kids will need to harness their acute powers of observation to identify each bone and work collaboratively to put the pieces together. This project highlights inductive and deductive reasoning skills, sequencing and problem-solving abilities.

p1-prep-camp

Get your little one all set for Primary school with our 4-day prep camp aimed at honing essential skills used daily in the classroom. Through a series of fun and engaging activities, your child will enhance his ability to listen and remember, pay attention in class, think and ask questions and communicate effectively.Join us for a P1 prep camp that will help your child grow to become an independent and confident learner!

 

 

The Little Executive also conducts regular classes using their research-based specialist-designed programme that aims to develop essential brain-based skills and cognitive processes that children need in order to succeed both in and out of the classroom. The Little Executive is running free trial classes every Saturday for their regular classes until 26 Nov 2016 for N2 to P1 kids.

Obtaining his astronaut certificate!

Obtaining his astronaut certificate!

Reach for the stars

Reach for the stars

Contact details are listed here:

The Little Executive
144 Bukit Timah Road
Singapore 229844
69081889
knockknock@thelittleexecutive.asia


Disclaimer: The Little Executive sponsored the Astronaut Training Camp for my son for the purpose of a review. No monetary compensation was received, and all opinions are my own. 

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One morning I woke to find Asher engrossed in the first book of Harry Potter. I wasn’t quite sure what to think, and wondered if it was a bit too dark and scary for him. After assuring me that it really was okay and not too scary*, he promptly said, “Petrificus totalus! Mummy you cannot move anymore!” Followed by gleeful laughter.

In the days that followed he would burst into the house when he came home from school and cast the body bind spell on Ellery who gamely froze up each time. We decided that a kiss would remove the spell and I managed to save Ellery for a few days. That was until Asher came home and put the body bind spell on both Ellery and I. Yes, during that period it was not safe to be in our house at 7.10pm everyday.

Imagine Asher’s excitement when I told him we would be going for a workshop where he could design his own spells!

We were invited to Spell CraftINK, a creative writing workshop for children by Monsters Under The Bed (MUTB). INK stands for Imagination N’ Knowledge, and INK Workshops are three-day creative writing programmes that stimulate children’s imagination and passion for writing. Participants engage in role-playing, group discussions, and physical activities that expand their creative space. Each INK Workshop has a unique theme, from zombies and Greek mythology, to investigation and in this run, magic!

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Monsters Under The Bed

The fun started even before the first day of the workshop. We received an email from Monsters Under The Bed a week before the workshop with a letter from Professor Double-X, the Principal of the Mundane School of Monsters and Magic. In it, we were told that Asher was provisionally accepted into the Mundane School of Monsters and Magic because he displayed some innate magical ability. As a result, he was invited for a trial course to assess his capabilities at wielding his latent magical powers. Depending on his performance, he would either be accepted by the school or rejected. We learned that ordinary non-magical people were known as Mundanes, and Mundane children, Munlings.

Along with the letter came a sheet giving detailed explanations of the different types of magic: Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, Water, and Chaos. We were told each Munling had an affinity with a particular type of magic depending on their month and year of birth. Asher was so excited to discover one of his affinities was Fire magic because it is the magic of destruction. Uh huh. Like, so happy. Metal was his other affinity and he thought that was cool too since it was the magic of transformation.

Professor Double-X had tasked them to start thinking up spells related to their affinities in preparation for the Munling trial course. Munling Asher (with sidekick Munling Ellery) plunged into the pre-workshop activity with so much excitement that I regretted telling them about it just before bedtime. Even after lights out they kept talking in the dark about the spells they wanted to create. I had to go in to cast the powerful, “OR ELSE” spell to make them sleep.

Spell CraftINK!

Spell CraftINK!

The day of the workshop was one of those rare days that I didn’t have to nag at the boys to get out of the house. The children met Professor Double-X, an artificial human that did not possess any imagination. This was unusual because only those who had imaginations could cast spells. So even though she was the principal of the Mundane School of Monsters and Magic, she could not cast any spells! She spoke in a robotic voice from the moment she introduced herself, and I wondered if she was going to continue to do so the entire time. Halfway through the day one of house masters cast a spell on her to let her speak normally, but you gotta give her credit for staying in character though!

The excitement of all the children was palpable, and they sat with rapt attention as Professor Double-X introduced the different houses and their unique characteristics. The kids were sorted into houses (which corresponded roughly with their age groups), and met their house masters. Asher was in the youngest group, called Muse house, and he was thrilled because one of the main types of magic used by this house was, you guessed it, Fire magic!

On the pretext of thinking up some magic, the kids were led through some warm-up activities to get them primed to think out-of-the-box and be totally free to dream up anything they wanted. This then led nicely into the process of ‘scribing’ their spells. They had to come up with one of each type of spell, and give details like what words to say, what the effects of the spell are, how widespread its effects were, and how long those effects lasted for. Through the process of scribing, the children learnt how to systematically develop their ideas, building on it bit by bit. They were encouraged to be as detailed as possible, as that would lead to more powerful magic.

All the kids plunged into the activity, and even Asher eagerly scribbled away at the table, writing down his ideas for one spell after another. Normally it’s very hard to get him to write if it’s not for school work, but here he was eagerly doing so!

First activity to warm up

First activity to warm up

Kids taking turns to tell their house master what they wrote

Kids taking turns to tell their house master what they wrote

When everyone had scribed all their spells, the house masters demonstrated how the different spells could be used by having a duel! They picked various spells from the kids and used them on each other to the kids delight. Turning everyone into rabbits, shooting fireballs, creating monsters, blasting zaps…the kids had such a good time feeding the house masters more and more spells to use.

A duel!

A duel!

The highlight of the day came when the kids could exchange the ‘essence tokens’ they had earned through the course of the day for a magic wand! Asher took this very seriously and really studied all the wands before picking his. I must say the facilitators really put in a lot of effort to make each wand unique – every single wand was handcrafted with a different style!

The school store

Brisk business at the school’s store

Hand-crafted wands

Hand-crafted wands

Selecting his wand

Selecting his wand

Using the wand straightaway!

Using the wand straightaway!

Playing spell tricks on their house master

Playing spell tricks on their house master

The kids were tasked to go back and work on their spells some more because they would need them the following day.

Day 2 was an action-packed day with lots of magic flying around everywhere! First though, the kids walked into the room to find a warning message written in…blood? From who? Who wanted the Munlings to leave? The mysterious writer left no clue, so the kids had no choice but to move on with their Munling training.

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Who wants the  Munlings gone?

There was to be a tournament among the houses to see which house could get past all the magical protective layers of the opponent’s house and retrieve an orb in order to control the opponent’s house pet. Not your average pet please, but a dragon phoenix, a shape-shifting cat, and a zombie mermaid. The houses split up to discuss their defenses and build their imaginary fortresses. I appreciated how the facilitators made sure to let each kid contribute ideas so that they all felt included in the process, no matter how wacky the idea. The facilitators really listened, and where needed they made suggestions to tweak some of the ideas to better suit the story.

Gathering ideas from the children of Muse House

Gathering ideas from the children of Muse House

Planning the layout of the Muse House dungeon

Planning the layout of the Muse House

Once all the houses had built their imaginary dungeons, the tournament commenced! The houses went to each other’s dungeons to try and break in using the spells they developed previously. The opponent’s house master acted as the story master, telling them what was happening and the obstacles they encountered. The kids would then have to agree on the best course of action to tackle the hurdle. Teams were awarded extra points for active participation and cooperation.

So much excitement, so much drama and magic, and lots of ideas tossed about! The facilitators were really excellent. They encouraged all the children to speak up and share their ideas, they made sure everyone was listening to the idea, and after hearing a few options, they let the children decide what they felt was the best decision. Sometimes the decision led to them overcoming the obstacle, sometimes it didn’t and the kids would go back to discussing options again. The tournament took up the rest of day 2, but the kid’s energy levels did not wane. They were so eager to infiltrate the opposing house’s fortifications, and cheered when they finally retrieved the orb!

Thinking of various ways to combat Minerva and Metis House's obstacles

Thinking of various ways to combat Minerva and Metis House’s obstacles

Altogether

So many eager hands wanting to share their ideas

The final day was less dramatic, but was very useful for consolidating all the ideas and stories the kids had created and role-played the day before. Day 3 was spent writing down their experience of breaking into one of the opposing house’s dungeons. They had to write down how they got past at least two of the obstacles in as much detail as they could.

Professor Double-X telling the kids what to do for the writing activity

Professor Double-X speaking to the kids before they started writing

You would have thought that the kids wouldn’t been so interested in day 3’s activities, but the whole room was filled with the quiet buzz of kids writing, thinking aloud to themselves, double-checking with each other what had happened at a particular battle, etc. I was completely floored by the amount that Asher wrote. I have never in my life seen that boy write so much. And with such neat handwriting to boot. His school teacher has mentioned how his handwriting needed a lot of work. She would have been so impressed with him! Seriously, even the spacing between words and letters was good! I couldn’t believe my eyes! It was clear to me that when a piece of work was important to him ( and I made a mental note about how important school work was to him…) he can do things very neatly and nicely. Ok, on the bright side, at least I know he’s capable of it :)

Helping some kids recall the details of the adventure they went through the day before

Helping some kids recall the details of the adventure they went through the day before

Totally engrossed in the writing process

Totally engrossed in his work

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Shockingly long (and neat) piece of work

The kids then compiled their spells and stories into a little booklet that they could bring home. There was also the final tally on the house points, and Asher’s Muse house won!

Putting everything together into a book

Putting everything together into a book

Muse House celebrating their win!

Muse House celebrating their win!

And then, the grand finale! I was revealed that one of the house masters wanted to shut down the school because he didn’t believe Munlings should learn magic. He wanted to finish off Professor Double-X! Oh no! The Professor couldn’t defend herself because she couldn’t cast magic! What now? All the kids whipped out their wands and started casting spells to try and defeat the house master, but he deftly overcame them all. Until someone hit on the idea of giving Professor Double-X the gift of imagination! Now able to cast spells, she put a powerful spell on the house master and defeated him!

All the kids casting spells to save Professor Double-X

The kids casting spells to save Professor Double-X

The kids left the workshop still yammering away about the spells, the stories they wrote, how they defeated the bad house master, and playfully putting spells on each other. Suffice to say that they had a blast.

If there was one thing I thought could improve the workshop further, it would be for the facilitators to perhaps talk a little bit more explicitly about writing techniques, perhaps on the last day. I believe they were trying to let the children absorb the techniques on their own, which is fun but it’s uncertain whether the children know what techniques they have learned from the workshop. While it could be useful to state the purpose of the activities, even in passing, so that the kids understand how what they are doing could relate to future writing activities, I can see how that could interrupt the flow of the activities and dampen the momentum. Perhaps what can be done is for the facilitators to sum up the techniques learned on the final day before or after the kids get down to writing their stories (before as a guide to their writing, or after to summarise the key takeaways).

Nevertheless, it was a very good workshop indeed. Asher was very proud of the story he wrote and eagerly showed it to Jon at night. The workshop succeeded in showing Asher that he capable of writing longer stories and that story writing is fun. I hope this translates to more interest in writing in school, and neater handwriting too! If nothing else, it was really a lot of fun and Asher had a great time at Spell CraftINK! He’s already looking forward to joining another INK workshop in the year end holidays!

Munlings with Professor Double-X and the house masters

Munlings with Professor Double-X and some of the house masters

The cast of Monsters Under The Bed

The cast of Monsters Under The Bed

Monsters Under The Bed are organising two more workshops at the end of this year. HowlINK run from 25-27 November and has a spooky werewolf mystery theme, while INK to the Void runs from 14-16 December and had to do with space adventures (the new Star Wars film is opening afterall).

***Up for Grabs***

MUTB are generously offering three 10% discount vouchers for three readers for the upcoming HowlINK. It will be a case of first come first served, so hurry and be the first three to leave a comment below! All you need to do is leave your name, email, and say “Aaaahhhwwwwooooooooo!”
HowlINK Poster copy

You can register for the workshops online, call them at +65-61004363, or email them directly at riza@mutb.com.sg.

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Disclaimer: Asher was given a complimentary invitation to attend this workshop, but all opinions are my own. 

For the discount voucher, winners will be contacted by email to confirm their win and must respond within 24 hours, failing which, the next person in line will be given the voucher instead.
*After discussion with the hubby, we’ve drawn the line at book 1. Asher is clamouring after book 2, but he has been told to wait and not borrow it from the school library even if it was available. General consensus among those I’ve asked is that book 2 onwards is too dark for kids his age.

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For some reason, there has been so much talk about durians this year. You can smell when the durian season rolls around, but it seems there’s been an extra interest in the King of Fruits this season. Everyone is talking about durians! And all this talk just made us want to go out and get some for ourselves!

The boys have had durian flavoured cakes, ice-cream, and durian puffs, but have never eaten it straight from the source. We’ve had durian with our family before but the boys had been too engrossed playing with their cousins to notice any strange, spiky fruits lying about, nor a fragrant/pungent smell wafting through the house.

So when Jon and I decided to head to Katong to buy home some durians, it really was the boys’ first ever durian makan session. What fun it was!

I like the durian opening process, and discovering the inside of each fruit is just so fascinating to me! One more section, and one more section, and one more… Knowing that the boys have never seen a durian being opened before (yes, so suaku), I asked them how they thought the durian flesh was taken out from the fruit. Asher thought you needed very thick gloves to handle the durian, then the skin had to be pealed off like a kiwi. Ellery thought all the spikes had to be cut blunt then the skin peeled off like an orange round and around. They both guessed that the inside of the durian would be like a melon, and you could cut it into slices. Very amusing :) They badgered me to tell them what it was really like, but I simply told them to wait and see.

Thick gloves, check.

Thick gloves, check.

Goodness. Having not bought durians for a few seasons, I did not realise that there were so many types of durians now. Besides the famous D24 and mao shan wang, there are the black pearl, golden phoenix, red prawn, green bamboo, XO, etc. Honestly, I have no idea what the differences are between these types. I just tell the durian seller, “bittersweet and creamy!” We were recommended the green bamboo durians. Jon and I had a late night durian outing a few nights before but the durian was very disappointing. We had gone too late, so there weren’t many choices left. The durian was thin, ‘watery’, and too sweet for my liking. But these durians from 227 Katong Durian were so good! And although business was brisk, the stall holders were patient. You could also see that they took care to choose good durians for you (important if you are, like me, quite clueless about how to pick good durians).

227 Katong Durian

227 Katong Durian

Asher was so eager to have some he was quite upset that we didn’t let him have a taste when the Uncle asked us to try it. I did though, and it was good! I couldn’t wait to get home!

Out came the newspapers to line the floor. Out came the durians from the bag. Eager hands couldn’t wait to get their fingers on creamy treats. Were it not for the thorns, the boys would have grabbed the durians themselves.

Mini durian party

Mini durian party

As Jon opened the first durian, the boys were more interested in the fleshy pieces. It was perfect! Exactly as I had hoped – bittersweet and creamy. They licked their fingers and thought that was it. Then Jon opened another segment. Asher’s eyes went wide! It was hilarious! They were absolutely delighted that the durians had small sections with ‘baby’ durians inside (small bite sized pieces).

Mmmmmmm

Mmmmmmm

Nom nom nom

Nom nom nom

We didn’t get many, so before we knew it, all the durian was gone! Poof! So much faster than I had expected. I told them there’ll be a next round. Ellery thought I meant that very night and he was so disappointed there would be no more durians! We showed them how to drink from the durian shells so their bodies wouldn’t be ‘heaty’, and wash their hands by rubbing the inside of the durian shell so there wouldn’t be a strong smell left on their fingers. It was past bedtime, so I hurried them to bed with playful threats of swinging durian shells at them if they didn’t go to bed quickly.

Spiky

King of Fruits

When I think of durian makan sessions, I remember all the times from my childhood when my parents or their friends bought durians, how we shared them with friends, neighbours, cousins (and a priceless memory of my cheeky brother chasing my durian-hating cousin with a piece of durian), and church friends (everyone would pool orders at church camp in Malaysia and an uncle would buy back several baskets of the fruit!).

The next day Asher surprised us with this note. And I realised that we love the King of Fruits not just because it tastes great, but because it gives us the chance to build bonds of love.

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A sweet surprise in the morning

Durian is more than just a yummy fruit. Durian is a reason to gather, an experience to share.

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Bo Geh

Asher’s lost his first tooth!

He excitedly came home and ran into my room to show me that gap in his teeth. The shaky tooth had been bothering him for a couple of weeks and had affected his appetite too because it was just too uncomfortable to eat.

I find it really funny that in our house we were excitedly waiting for his tooth to drop, while excitedly waiting for Alyssa’s tooth to sprout.

Anyway, here he is showing off his little gap to me hahahaha

AHHHH

AHHHH

AHHHHHHHHHH!!!

AHHHHHHHHHH!!!

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After visiting the LKCNHM, we went to JCube for lunch and ice skating! The boys had been asking to go ice skating over the weekend for some reason, so it was a good opportunity to scratch that itch and bring them for a skating session.

They had so much fun! And it made me happy to see them enjoying themselves so much.

Ellery with a penguin

Ellery with a penguin

Trying to balance on the ice

Trying to balance on the ice

We changed the penguin to a seal so that they could take turns riding on it. It was also more stable for Ellery when using it as a support.

We changed the penguin to a seal so that they could take turns riding on it. It was also more stable for Ellery when using it as a support.

Taking turns

Taking turns

Asher managed to skate on his own :)

Asher managed to skate on his own :)

Skating is fun!

Skating is fun!

And to top of a day filled with fun and activity, the boys got to stay over at my parents place. They love going there for sleepovers. So it was a perfect ending to a fun-filled day :)

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Asher took part in his first art exhibition. I was thrilled to learn it would be held at the Arts House because it’s such a beautiful building, and so historically significant.

He painted a fish and called it ‘Fish in the Sea’. It took several lessons to finish this piece, and he was happy with the final outcome. There were times when he was starting to lose steam in the process, especially when doing the collage bits because he found it tedious to tear and stick the little pieces of paper. I like how it turned out though, and he’s happy with it too.

It was good to see all the other art pieces on display as well, and especially interesting to see how one theme was interpreted by people in so many different ways.

Art is one of the things that really makes Asher happy. I wonder how far he’ll take it :)

All of us with his art work

All of us with his art work

On the wall with other sea creature art works

On the wall with other sea creature art works

He likes art!

He liked the other art pieces he saw there too

Outside the Arts House & Ellery photobombing the pic

Outside the Arts House & Ellery photobombing the pic

Being boys

Being boys

Ellery so pleased that he could climb up on his own

Ellery so pleased that he could climb up on his own

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Study Buddy

So one morning I walked into the boys room to find Ellery helping Asher with his spelling practice! Ellery was telling Jon how important his job was, and that he couldn’t go and do whatever it was Jon was asking him to do because he needed to help Asher.

Brothers that study together, stay together?

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Ellery dictating, Asher writing out the words

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